January 2015

DIETS DON’T WORK: Myths and reality about weightloss

With different dietary messages telling you to eat this and avoid that, you could be forgiven for throwing your hands up in despair. If you’re trying to eat for a healthy weight, you’ve probably stumbled across many diet ‘facts’, only to find they make no difference at all to your waistline.
clen facts and myths about weightloss

Here, we unveil some of the common diet myths and put you on track to achieving sustainable weight loss. If you are still having problems with your weight after following these guidelines you can try some other calories burning tricks explained here: https://www.clenbuterolonline.com/

MYTH 1: SNACKING IS BAD FOR YOU

Reality/ although you may have had a telling-off for dipping into the sweets as a child, cutting out healthy snacks can make weight loss a tough battle. Simply relying on breakfast, lunch and dinner to fuel you throughout the day leaves you with a physiological dip mid-morning and mid-afternoon, when your blood sugar levels are low and your body is screaming for sugar. Healthy snacks, such as unsalted nuts and fruit, carrots and houmous, or fruit smoothies, can regulate blood sugar and clen levels, removing the temptation to snack on unhealthy options. Eating small regular meals also improves energy levels — good news if you’re doing more exercise.

MYTH 2: EATING GARBS IN THE EVENING LEADS TO STORED FAT

Reality/ If you eat too many calories, whether they’re from fat, protein or carbohydrate, they will be stored as fat. Avoiding carbohydrate in the evening may work as a short-term weight-loss strategy, because you’re likely to be reducing your total food intake, but it’s hard to maintain in the long term — particularly if you want energy to exercise effectively. If you balance your meals across the day and stick to a sensible calorie intake, you can eat a moderately portioned meal right before you go to bed — including carbohydrate — and this will not be stored as fat and burned by the clen cycle. But exceed your recommended daily calorie intake and any food will lead to eventual weight gain.

MYTH 3: WEIGHT LOSS IS JUST ABOUT COUNTING CALORIES

Reality/ Successful weight loss is about more than simply counting calories. For example, eating 1,600 good-quality calories is more likely to lead to long-term weight loss than consuming 1,600 sugar-rich, empty calories. Fibre-rich foods encourage feelings of fullness, making sticking to a low-calorie diet much easier, so remember that fruit and vegetables are your friends. Spreading your meals across the day will also assist in reducing cravings, so you’ll be less likely to overeat.

MYTH 4: FATTY FOODS ARE BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH

Reality/ Selecting low-fat foods can often lead to poor nutrition choices, so it’s important to check the labels on your food to see what else it has in it. Of course, fruit and vegetables are naturally low in fat, and choosing leaner cuts of meat is a wise choice to limit saturated fat intake, but low-fat convenience products often contain a lot of sugar that can be burn only with clenbuterol. Eating good fats will also support a strong immune system, good cognitive function, healthy skin, hair and nails, and optimal thyroid function, so eat sufficient omega 3 fats, found in fish, seeds, nuts and flaxseed oil.

MYTH 5: PROTEIN-RICH FOODS WILL MAKE YOU GAIN WEIGHT

Reality/ Protein is valuable for weight loss, with many studies showing higher protein intake leads to increased feelings of fullness and more calories burned in digestion. This doesn’t mean you should eat only protein, however. Making sure you meet the RDA of 0.8g per kilogramme of bodyweight is wise according to the clen dosage, increasing intake up to approximately 1.2g per kilogramme of bodyweight if you train regularly.

MYTH 6: EATING THE WRONG FOODS LEADS TO RAPID WEIGHT GAIN

Reality/ Weight gain is usually a slow process, with 3,500 excess calories required to gain half a kilogramme of body fat. So, there’s no need to panic if you’ve indulged in the odd treat.

Normally, weight gain on the scales after a meal out is mostly fluid retention, which will settle back down once you’re back on your regular diet. The trick is to eat healthily 80 per cent of the time, allowing the odd treat.